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Old Mar 5th 2015, 07:45 PM   #21
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I Ride: Ducati 2010 SFS, Ducati 2012 1199 S
Originally Posted by Cloner View Post
Call Dan at Kyle Racing and he has them on the shelf in a kit with dust seals for less than Ducati charge for just fork seals. He also keeps Ohlins oil, so get a litre of that, too. Dan is the largest Ohlins distributor in the States (world?), so he's always a good resource for Ohlins bits and tools. He'll probably already know it for Panigale, but it's best if you have the number stamped on the inside of the lower fork boss available for reference (FGXXX).

Like Charlie said, always replace fork seals in pairs (it takes almost no additional real time since one leg is already off) and always use Ohlins oil...though it's close to 5 wt if you're in a real pinch. And like Brad said, if you're in there for any reason always reassemble with new seals, regardless of brand of fork.

I don't know what the deal is, but Ohlins forks seem to lose seals more quickly than other brands. Maybe they use a larger clearance to reduce stiction? That said, they're also easier to service than Showa or Kayaba, so it call comes out in the wash!
Quite right.

If I may add, regarding the use of genuine OHLINS oil.
The OHLINS forks are valved around, and designed specifically for the use of their oil.
It's a matched system.

In using a substitute fork oil, one is genuinely departing from the intended designed characteristics and specs of the fork.
There may even be some genuine seal compatibility issues.

The OHLINS fork oil is quite different in formulation to anything else on the market.
The only fork oil that comes close in performance is Showa, but it's still not comparable.
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Old Mar 5th 2015, 11:39 PM   #22
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Fork seal

Originally Posted by Scorpio66 View Post
Does anybody know how to take the forks off? I can get easily to the point where I remove the wheel, the fender but I've never remove a panigale fork.


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I assume you have front stand that goes to the steering stem.

Here is how I do it:
0. Loosen the fork preload to minimum (fully anticlockwise), and set the dampings to minimum (largest number in the settings)
1. Undo one leg's fork pinch bolts.
2. Undo the fork axle nut
3. Undo the other fork pinch bolt.
4. Undo the brake caliper bolts.

Now jack the bike up using your front stand.
Remove the brake calipers. I don't like them hanging off too long so I always hang them loosely using wires (or strong threads).
Then remove the front wheel and keep it somewhere.

5. Remove the horn (13mm open end spanner)
6. Remove the black plastic that covers the chin (3 x 4mm allen bolts)
7. Undo the handlebar (1x allen bolt) and remove the handlebar from the fork. Hold the handlebar using cable ties looped between it and the fairing hole by the mirror if needed (especially the right hand one)
8. Undo the upper triple clamp (1x bolt)
9. Loosen the fork cap (no, do not take it off. Just loosen it)
10. Undo the lower triple clamp bolts (3x 5mm allen bolts). Loosen the bolts quite well a bit. This is probably the hardest bit!

Then carefully slide the fork downward until it is loose.
Done.

Fitting it is the exact opposite. No need to tighten the fork cap too much as the triple clamp and handlebar would help keep it tight.
Also don't gorilla the triple clamp bolts and the handlebar bolts.

How to fasten the front axle nut:
Fasten one pinch bolt, then fit the axle nut and torque.
Then loosen the pinch bolt again.
Put the bike on the ground and bounce on the suspension a bit.
Then torque the axle pinch bolts one leg at a time. On each leg, do 1-2-1 pattern for torqueing (doesn't matter which bolt is 1 or 2).
Install the brake calipers. Half-torque the caliper bolts, then squeeze the brake lever tight a few times.
Then, while squeezing (ideally), tighten and torque the bolts.

P.s. if you are taking the left fork, don't forget the speed sensor bolted to it. It needs to be taken off first.

P.p.s. i like how Brad always spell Ohlins with all caps
Thanks from Phl, Scorpio66 and No more twinstar
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Old Sep 27th 2016, 10:05 AM   #23
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Sorry to bring up an old thread, but one of my forks is leaking pretty good and I need to get it repaired. Called my local dealership and they want $125 per fork for the seal kits and 3 hours of labor which comes out to around $550.

I found the seal kit on Kyle Racing's site, but I want to make sure it's the right one. Also, says its sold in pairs, does that mean one kit at $75 will do both forks?
Ohlins 43mm Fork Seals 04730-03
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Old Sep 27th 2016, 11:16 AM   #24
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I Ride: 1199 Panigale ABS
Originally Posted by No more twinstar View Post
Ohlins forks require a rebuild every 10,000 miles or even less. The potential cost of overhauling electronic ones worries me and is one of the reasons that I'm buying a base model. I will always have the option to install an Ohlins cartridge kit and shock later.



That said, I'm unsure what to expect from Marzocchi in that regard...


Expect the worst from marzochhi ! The seals they use are cheapest crap. Any way they k- tech or ohlins cartridges are a must for a base model especially if you are out of warranty. While still on warranty I had my forks replaced twice as in both cases damping was gone after 2 month.


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Old Oct 1st 2016, 02:35 AM   #25
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I Ride: Base Panigale
Had the same issue. Went K tech. Big improvement
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Old Dec 1st 2016, 04:26 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Kozman23 View Post
Sorry to bring up an old thread, but one of my forks is leaking pretty good and I need to get it repaired. Called my local dealership and they want $125 per fork for the seal kits and 3 hours of labor which comes out to around $550.

I found the seal kit on Kyle Racing's site, but I want to make sure it's the right one. Also, says its sold in pairs, does that mean one kit at $75 will do both forks?
Ohlins 43mm Fork Seals 04730-03
Did these work for you?
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Old Jul 25th 2018, 10:23 AM   #27
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I am changing the fork seals on my 1299S which are also 43mm Ohlins. The Ducati workshop manual shows 155cc (155ml) of fork oil per leg. This can't be right, I extracted 700ml aprox. from both legs and one of them was already leaking. I assume they mean 155mm of air measured from the top of the fork but I'm not sure, somebody knows the correct amounf of fork oil per leg?
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