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Old Mar 3rd 2015, 06:09 PM   #1
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Fork seal

Hello gents

Anybody had a seal going bad already? My 2012 1199s starts leaking from the left fork. Not very bad but still a leak.

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Old Mar 3rd 2015, 08:37 PM   #2
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Yep. Just replaced the left one last week, and going to replace the right one this week.
The right one was only residual. But the left one was up to the point where the oil would seep out and drip onto the floor overnight before I had the chance to replace it.

While replacing it, I couldn't believe how black the oil was too. I guess all those track abuse really took the life out of the fluid. After replaced, the response was a lot better, one can notice how much better the fork damping actually is now (but you can't notice how bad it was before).

Mine is 2012 1199s too.
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Old Mar 3rd 2015, 11:54 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Marmoot View Post
Yep. Just replaced the left one last week, and going to replace the right one this week.
The right one was only residual. But the left one was up to the point where the oil would seep out and drip onto the floor overnight before I had the chance to replace it.

While replacing it, I couldn't believe how black the oil was too. I guess all those track abuse really took the life out of the fluid. After replaced, the response was a lot better, one can notice how much better the fork damping actually is now (but you can't notice how bad it was before).

Mine is 2012 1199s too.
Did you do the job yourself or have a shop do it?
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 02:16 AM   #4
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A friend did it. He does that sort of things professionally as a side business. I won't trust myself with the innards of a gold coloured thing
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 03:26 AM   #5
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Probably a wise choice , was just wondering , I do them on all my dirt bikes but not sure of these gold things with wires coming out the top! Not that I need to do them yet but I am sure one day the need will arise. Was hoping you were going to tell me "there's nothing to hard about it '
Has anyone else had a go at them? If so was there anything difficult about it?
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 06:03 AM   #6
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Ohlins for sure

Ohlins forks require a rebuild every 10,000 miles or even less. The potential cost of overhauling electronic ones worries me and is one of the reasons that I'm buying a base model. I will always have the option to install an Ohlins cartridge kit and shock later.

That said, I'm unsure what to expect from Marzocchi in that regard...
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 08:03 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by crankman View Post
Probably a wise choice , was just wondering , I do them on all my dirt bikes but not sure of these gold things with wires coming out the top! Not that I need to do them yet but I am sure one day the need will arise. Was hoping you were going to tell me "there's nothing to hard about it '
Has anyone else had a go at them? If so was there anything difficult about it?
43mm Ohlins are actually quite easy to disassemble for a fork seal change. No need to remove the damping assembly for this task. The only specialty tools you absolutely have to have are pin wrench to remove the fork cap and a small tool to hold the damping rod up against the spring spacer to remove and reinstall the cap. It's handy to have a 43mm seal driver and they make a tool to loosen the locking nut at the top of the damping rod, but you can make do with a standard wrench and a little patience. There's also a tool to hold the damping rod up and bleed it, but it's not necessary, either.

The only part I don't have personal experience with is the electronic adjusters, but I assume they just come out with the cap....they're just a little motor to turn the adjusting screws for you. I guess I could look at the manual, but where's the fun in that?

Loosen the cap, then spin it off the upper and slide the upper down the fork leg. Push the spring down while holding the cap up and insert the little tool between the damping rod lock nut and the spring preload spacer. Hold the lock nut and remove the cap from the rod. Remove the little rod inside the damping rod. As you drain the oil by inverting the fork you'll want to keep a hand beneath the fork leg. The spring preload spacer and spring will come out first, followed by a couple of small pieces, a small spring and piston, and you'll need those later! Slide the upper and lower apart. Drive the dust seal out of the upper and remove the seal retainer beneath it with a small screwdriver or pick. Remove the seal with a puller (you can use a dulled flat screw driver if you like, but be careful not to mar anything). Install the new seal with the driver, install the lock ring, install new dust seals. Lubricate the new seal and dust seal with fork oil. Reassemble the upper and lower taking care when the lower slides through the seal not to force it...a gentle twist will help. Fill it with Ohlins oil and pump the damping rod up and down until you bleed out the air.....8 or 10 times at a minimum. Set the oil level to the recommended spec. Install the spring. Install the spring spacer. Pull up the damping rod (there's a nice tool for this too, but you don't absolutely have to have one...it's helpful for bleeding it a few steps earlier, too, as it deflects oil back into the fork) and hold it while you insert the tool you used to hold the spring down below the nut. Install the piston that came out when you drained the oil...pointy end down...and the spring above it. Install the small rod inside the damping rod. Screw the cap onto the damping rod and lock it against the lock nut. Remove the holding tool. Pull the upper up against the cap and screw them together. Tighten them just snug (don't use the "gorilla grip") and put it back on the bike. Voila!
Thanks from Gecko, Scorpio66 and crankman

Last edited by Cloner; Mar 4th 2015 at 08:05 AM.
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 09:15 AM   #8
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Tip (in addition to what Cloner sez).

Since you have the front end up and have taken one fork off....take the other fork off and do the seals on both. Won't take much more time and insures the seals are good (and the fork oil checked/freshened) on both.

I used to do the seals (when they needed it) on my off-road Husky (usd Showa) and learned it's a good idea to go ahead and do both. If one seal has gone bad, you can bet there's a good chance the other is getting dicey...
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 11:30 AM   #9
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Thanks Cloner & Charliem90 for the feedback, sounds like its pretty much the same procedure as the dirt bikes I have done many times , as I said I am not up for seals yet but I will start to look for 43 mm seal driver , everything else you mention I think I have covered.
Appreciate the info.
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Old Mar 4th 2015, 11:38 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by crankman View Post
Probably a wise choice , was just wondering , I do them on all my dirt bikes but not sure of these gold things with wires coming out the top! Not that I need to do them yet but I am sure one day the need will arise. Was hoping you were going to tell me "there's nothing to hard about it '
Has anyone else had a go at them? If so was there anything difficult about it?
It's the same work as any other variation of an R&T FG 43 unit.
In this case, one shock is for compression and the other is for rebound with these units.
The wires unplug from the top of the fork after you pull the boots back and slide them up with a squirt of silicon spray.
Be careful you don't damage the tabs that hold the plugs together.
Have a real good look before proceeding at any stage and take notes/pics if necessary.

Other than that, it's a case of re-assemble in the correct order. Opposite to the way you pulled them apart.

Set the oil level correctly.
And most importantly, use the correct OHLINS fork oil.
On the Sunny coast, Ducati Noosa has it in stock.
Thanks from crankman
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