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View Poll Results: Is Ducati 1199 fit for a beginner?!
Yes 3 3.61%
No 60 72.29%
If you really want, yes 20 24.10%
Voters: 83. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Mar 30th 2012, 06:09 PM   #21
vik
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I Ride: Panigale 1199 Base ABS
sorry but i dont agree 1199 should be your first bike, infact even a 848 is not a good choice! far from it! it seems like a you smart guy, so have some patience! buy a used 600, if you are too concerned about not knowing how to pick the right bike, buy a new one, a cheap jap 600! ride the shit out of it, you will be leaps and bounds better than where you are at this stage in short six months, depending on your drive and passion. riding a motorcycle is an art, any monkey can buy an expensive car and drive it, but bikes are a whole different ballgame. even if you take it slow and respect the throttle, if you hit a bump/pothole on the 1199, and if you are not paying attention, the jolt from the bump will send the throttle flying and it will be the end of your biking. you can read all you want but there is no substitute for experience, your own experience. Im not trying to put you down or be negative, but if you just wait a little longer you will be a much better rider and will enjoy your 1199. Again if you fell in love with the 1199 why bother with an 848?

So get a trash 600, 6 months and 15000 miles later you will deserve a pani 1199!

good luck !
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Old Mar 30th 2012, 06:52 PM   #22
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I Ride: '13 S ABS in the correct colour
If you're a Russian squid, then it's perfect.
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Old Mar 30th 2012, 07:56 PM   #23
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Would you buy a Buggati or ferrari for your first car?

Every biker goes down for the early part of their riding career..............
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 03:14 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by vik View Post
sorry but i dont agree 1199 should be your first bike, infact even a 848 is not a good choice! far from it! it seems like a you smart guy, so have some patience! buy a used 600, if you are too concerned about not knowing how to pick the right bike, buy a new one, a cheap jap 600! ride the shit out of it, you will be leaps and bounds better than where you are at this stage in short six months, depending on your drive and passion. riding a motorcycle is an art, any monkey can buy an expensive car and drive it, but bikes are a whole different ballgame. even if you take it slow and respect the throttle, if you hit a bump/pothole on the 1199, and if you are not paying attention, the jolt from the bump will send the throttle flying and it will be the end of your biking. you can read all you want but there is no substitute for experience, your own experience. Im not trying to put you down or be negative, but if you just wait a little longer you will be a much better rider and will enjoy your 1199. Again if you fell in love with the 1199 why bother with an 848?

So get a trash 600, 6 months and 15000 miles later you will deserve a pani 1199!

good luck !
@vik, thanks for the detailed advise, I will follow it.
Agree with your words, especially with patience, 600, art, monkey and how to stay deserving Panigale

Today I'll go watch Monster 696

And by the way Moscow's Ducati bikeschool uses Monster too

Last edited by skontakt; Mar 31st 2012 at 03:24 AM.
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 03:23 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by skontakt View Post
29 age
186 cm (6.1 ft)
86 kg
Good physical shape

I want bike to ride fast and smart.
The Pani with "Wet" mode engaged is very similar specs to a CBR600RR (102BHP/184Kg wet vs the Pani 120bhp/188Kg wet)
So if you heed the advice others have given re: starting on a 600, then a Pani in "Wet" mode will be very similar in with respect to power to weight. With the advantage of a generally better performing platform.

But your comment "I want bike to ride fast and smart." Would indicate that, it is unlikely that you would keep the Pani in "Wet" mode whilst learning.
IMO, from this comment I would advise against starting out on a Pani as the temptation to "let her rip" may be too great for you to resist.

That said.. if you "ride the shit" out of a 250, you'll probably end in tears as well.

Last edited by littlejohn; Mar 31st 2012 at 03:30 AM.
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 03:32 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by Titaniumvalves View Post
Would you buy a Buggati or ferrari for your first car?
If you have the money.. sure why not? just because the power is there, doesn't mean that you have to use it.
Several years back, I taught my little sister how to drive on a 300kw V8. And that ended up being her first car for a while (Until I sold it)
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 07:11 AM   #27
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Many of the skills you'll need to learn are not specific to the bike and it's performace. Riders with years of experience pick up many little tricks and cautions. Someone made reference to learning on high performance cars, but that's very different, you ever see a car, without hitting anything, throw it's driver ten feet in the air? Search youtube for Checa's first lap high-side at the last WSB race. A door opening in front of you in a car is one thing, on a bike another. If a car loses traction, the driver isn't dropped on the road.

I have a collection, still growing, of things to watch out for, painted lines, manhole covers, especially in the wet. I routinely watch the heads of drivers near me, a head turning to glance at the mirror warns of a turn or lane change before the turn signal. Every time you touch the brakes or think about touching the brakes, you should be checking the mirrors. So many little hazards that are trivial in a car, can be life-threatening on a bike.

High performance bikes can surpise both the rider and surrounding traffic. Most people, after checking an adjacent lane have a little "clock" in their head that says it's OK for a short time and attention can be directed elsewhere. Bikes are so quick compared to a car, that we can surpise others by appearing suddenly in a place they thought safely clear. We need to compensate for the fact bikes are just quicker than cars.

The most important skill in traffic to develop is 360 degree awareness. You can not survive with a level of attention that would suffice in a car. Your attention all around should be such that you should never notice a car near you that you didn't see coming. In traffic I devote about a third of my attention to the mirrors.

While you might be able to handle the bike, a superbike will demand much more of your attention to just controlling it, leaving less attention to devote to learning to deal with others around you.

I don't want to sound discouraging, clearly I love bikes, all of the skills needed to be a good rider take time and experience to develop. Just remember "Good judgement comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgement". Get your experience where the stakes are small.
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 09:03 AM   #28
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I rode a CBR and a Katana back in the mid 90's when I was 15, had a bad accident, car slammed into me going 80mph while I was at a complete stop. Then I got an 848 in 2009 after not riding anything in between that time. I was afraid honestly but after a few months it all came back to me plus 1000+. I did drop my 848 at near a stop in gravel when the gravel just gave out under the front tire as I was putting the kick stand down. I slowly went down with it and kept my leg under until my friend came over to help me get her back up. Minimal damage but I was heart broken. I knew to be careful on gravel and dirt roads but it still took me by surprise. I will be riding my 1199 in wet mode while I get used to her. I haven't ridden anything for over a year since selling my 848.

If you are ok with dropping it and scratching it, fine. If you can learn while keeping it in wet mode, fine. If you can afford it no problem, fine.

If you know the above 3 things are 110% true, then go for it. Make sure to take a rider safety course before you even think about getting on your 1199 though. Then at least you get the most basic experience on someone elses bike lol.
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 11:39 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by littlejohn View Post
The Pani with "Wet" mode engaged is very similar specs to a CBR600RR (102BHP/184Kg wet vs the Pani 120bhp/188Kg wet)
So if you heed the advice others have given re: starting on a 600, then a Pani in "Wet" mode will be very similar in with respect to power to weight. With the advantage of a generally better performing platform.

But your comment "I want bike to ride fast and smart." Would indicate that, it is unlikely that you would keep the Pani in "Wet" mode whilst learning.
IMO, from this comment I would advise against starting out on a Pani as the temptation to "let her rip" may be too great for you to resist.

That said.. if you "ride the shit" out of a 250, you'll probably end in tears as well.
@littlejohn, Pani or 600 will provoke me. And I saw youtube CBR600RR isn't easy.
I decided to start with Monster 796.

Next questions is ABS.
Ducati M796 has only two options ABS or without, and you can't switch off ABS, unfortunatly.

If some one have experiences with ABS in start riding career please give you opinion.


PS: I know experienced riders will take to say no absolute better learn to slow down, but if the new riders who started with the ABS!?
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Old Mar 31st 2012, 11:58 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Bronston View Post
While you might be able to handle the bike, a superbike will demand much more of your attention to just controlling it, leaving less attention to devote to learning to deal with others around you.

I don't want to sound discouraging, clearly I love bikes, all of the skills needed to be a good rider take time and experience to develop. Just remember "Good judgement comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgement". Get your experience where the stakes are small.
@Bronston, absolutely agree with you.
The more so in Moscow drivers have no driving culture. And surprises are waiting for you everywhere.

In business, there are three types of people:
1. People who are afraid to take risks
2. People who love to take risks but do not take into account the dangers
3. People that take into account all the dangers and risk conscious

The most successful third type of course is probably applicable to riders.
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