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Old Nov 17th 2017, 09:24 AM   #1
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Getting into track riding

Hey gents, Iím getting into track riding next season and looking for some advice on what things I should be investing in between personal protection and bike prep.

Iíve done a few days in the past but planning on going to California Superbike school and looking for some insight on what I should be spending my money on.

Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated!


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Last edited by oracle462; Nov 22nd 2017 at 11:59 AM.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 10:28 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by oracle462 View Post
Hey gents, Iím getting into track riding next season and looking for some advice on what things I should be investing in between person Malika protection and bike prep.

Iíve done a few days in the past but planning on going to California Superbike school and looking for some insight on what I should be spending my money on.

Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated!


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full leathers, protection and some rider coaching.

Take your time enjoy it speed will come with seat time and nobody wins a track day.

Breath and enjoy.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 10:57 AM   #3
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Not sure what bike you have but it goes without saying, good tyres, a well serviced and carefully looked over bike. Have the bike transported to and from the track rather than riding if you can it makes for a much more relaxed session.

Good supply of tools for you and others around you and plenty of refreshments with a good alcohol free sleep the night before.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 11:26 AM   #4
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Gear: Don't break the bank. Expensive gear is more comfortable but offers similar protection to middle-tier gear (unless it's airbag vs non-airbag). However, invest in a good helmet that fits well. Also invest in an airbag system such as Hit-Air. Nearly all the coaches in my org wear it. Don't forget a back protector.

Bike protection: Crashing happens, and sliders help. R&G makes good products. You should also view tires as protection. Never run a cheap touring tire, or a tire that's old, even if it has tread left.

Trackdays/Coaching: The money you save on gear can be spent on the track and coaching.

A quick word about laptimers. Chasing lap times when you're a beginner can be dangerous imo. Work on the fundamentals first and then chase lap times when you become a proficient intermediate or advanced rider.

Push your limits but never ride beyond them, and enjoy yourself.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 12:12 PM   #5
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I used to help corner work for the Keith Code SBK school back when they were on Kawasaki's at Streets of Willow at Willow Springs.

Some of the drills were throttle, engine braking, proper apex and specific lines around the track, not just the race line. For example, you'll do 3 or 4th gear without any brakes one session, 1 or 2nd gear on the right side of the track. Our job as corner workers were to call in the students who were sketchy or didn't follow the drill. Going around the track w/out using your brakes and depending only on engine braking and confidence can be scary.

Some of these drills you might be able to practice during a C group track day.

The schools will definitely help you advance your track riding experience. My advice, since you've done a few track days already, is get more seat time. Stay in the novice group and if even if you feel that you've progressed, don't try to bump up to intermediate/B group. Have an instructor tow you around.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 12:38 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by able duc View Post
Not sure what bike you have but it goes without saying, good tyres, a well serviced and carefully looked over bike. Have the bike transported to and from the track rather than riding if you can it makes for a much more relaxed session.

Good supply of tools for you and others around you and plenty of refreshments with a good alcohol free sleep the night before.


I have an 899 and wondering about getting track fairings/sliders and such for bike prep.


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Old Nov 17th 2017, 01:24 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by RRnold View Post
I used to help corner work for the Keith Code SBK school back when they were on Kawasaki's at Streets of Willow at Willow Springs.

Some of the drills were throttle, engine braking, proper apex and specific lines around the track, not just the race line. For example, you'll do 3 or 4th gear without any brakes one session, 1 or 2nd gear on the right side of the track. Our job as corner workers were to call in the students who were sketchy or didn't follow the drill. Going around the track w/out using your brakes and depending only on engine braking and confidence can be scary.

Some of these drills you might be able to practice during a C group track day.

The schools will definitely help you advance your track riding experience. My advice, since you've done a few track days already, is get more seat time. Stay in the novice group and if even if you feel that you've progressed, don't try to bump up to intermediate/B group. Have an instructor tow you around.


I was planning on doing the California superbike school for a single day event to get some training/seat time. Iím an educator myself so I know how to be patient in learning to stay safe and enjoy!

Iím really interested in knowing where to invest money and whatís a waste for a beginner track rider. Iím not rich so I wonít be going every weekend during the summer, but I donít want to trash my bike either.


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Old Nov 17th 2017, 01:56 PM   #8
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if you want a hit air vest send me a pm i can get these for you. i wont track without one.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 01:59 PM   #9
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Since you're planning on doing the school, I would suggest doing a weekend event. 1 day will get your feet wet absorbing everything in. On day 2, you will be more relaxed and focused which can help you apply more of those drills.

Aside from that, a good set of tires, a proper suspension setup at the track and quality gear would be a great starting point.

With new gear, factor in time of breaking it in, hence seat time. Since it's new and stiff, it can fatigue you; you hand web from the gloves, your arches from new boots, wearing the armor in the suit etc. Full gear adds about 10-15 extra lbs and when it's new, it's tough to move around on the track.
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Old Nov 17th 2017, 02:28 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by oracle462 View Post
I was planning on doing the California superbike school for a single day event to get some training/seat time. I’m an educator myself so I know how to be patient in learning to stay safe and enjoy!

I’m really interested in knowing where to invest money and what’s a waste for a beginner track rider. I’m not rich so I won’t be going every weekend during the summer, but I don’t want to trash my bike either.


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Since you already said instruction and seat time...

Spend the necessary time/money to get your bike's ergonomics set up in a way that makes you comfortable. Everything is easier and makes much more sense if your bike's ergos allow you to interact with it comfortably.

After you have a reasonable grasp of the basics pay to have a suspension tuner spend some time with you to get a baseline setup for your bike. I highlight the fact that it's a baseline setup because it will need to change as your pace improves but at least you'll have a reference for how the bike should feel.
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Last edited by BTrain5489; Nov 17th 2017 at 02:34 PM.
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