Go Back   Ducati Forum > Ducati Panigale Forum > Ride Reports

Ride Reports Ride reports and pictures of your motorcycle riding adventures


Thanks Tree947Thanks
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Aug 28th 2014, 02:49 AM   #51
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

Sent you a PM. Thanks so much--unfortunately all the travel time, riding, photo editing/uploading and writing mean I'm always ahead of where I appear to be online. And just when I almost catch up it's time for another week of traveling.

If I make it back through Rome (I'm trying to get my bike into Pompei for a photo shoot, but am having little luck), I will let you know.

Updates in 3...2...1.....
AntiHero is offline  
 
Old Aug 28th 2014, 02:49 AM   #52
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

Left Rome and yes--pretty much all of the surrounding areas look like this:



On my way from Milan to Rome I saw a city built up on the hillside. Probably a good time to point out that there are advantages to riding on major or minor freeways: all major roads go through towns and cities that are majorly interesting. Often backroads--esp. in Italy--are in pretty bad shape, so what looks great on a map can look more like a war zone in person. Great if you have a supermoto and love the bumps, but terrible if you have a 50lb backpack on and are not/do not.

Anyhow, saw it while heading South, so figured I'd try and get back to it when I headed north again.

Not my pic:


Orvieto is one of those cities, if I have to confess, that I imagined staying in prior to the trip. A rustic, magnificent ruin of a city that made it quite impossible not to pretend I was living in a completely different era. The reality of it, though, is that it's just a show and tell city, really. Still cool, but too much of an attraction. Makes it feel artificial, even though it's not.



And oh yes, most of these places are pedestrian only, though I did ride by cops here and there who didn't seem to mind us much. Try to get away with breaking laws right in front of the Italian Police on a GoldWing!









Thanks from luke
AntiHero is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 02:51 AM   #53
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

One of the downsides about hitting up spots and taking photos while I'm on the move is it gets HOT. Or really cold. Or a combination of the two, especially whenever rain is involved. But typically to stop = to overheat. And walking around with lead-filled backpack in full leathers can be miserable, as illustrated here:



There have been times, I'll admit, that I see a spot that looks like a great photo spot, then after considering I have to turn around, remove my helmet, gloves, backpack and tank bag, get cameras out, take pics, then put all my gear back on and well....sometimes it's just easier to convince myself that the sight wasn't that spectacular after all. Or worse yet, I do stop to go through all the trouble and it ends up not being that cool anyways.



And sometimes it's worth the effort:


Then of course, some scenes don't even require getting off the bike.









As an FYI--click any pic to see it in full resolution.
AntiHero is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 02:52 AM   #54
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

Now one thing I do not like about Italy is how difficult getting a cold drink--or gas--or some toothpaste--or food can be. As grotesque as it is to see a Burger King or Starbucks every 10 min. can be in the US, when not having eaten for 8-16 hours (very common on this trip for me), I'd almost pay $5 just to see a Taco Bell Taco. It really can be commercially primitive in most places here. While stopped to see if I had a signal on my phone I saw a small sign for ice cream. I went inside and viola--food! Ok, not much, but they had little glasses of sorbet, two kinds of chips and, most importantly, water.

Course the guy there wasn't really the guy working there, so it took (not kidding) a good 5 minutes to get me wrung up on their cash register (a pen and paper). The guy was quite old and had either lost the ability to add or never had it.

Anyhow, I sat outside and then these guys showed up.



Certain small towns have their own code of conduct. Here, clearly, those wearing Plaid Shirts and Pants and NO SOCKS must sit on the left. Those in shorts and solids, WITH SOCKS, on the right. You can tell the guys in solid are unhappy about being relegated to the corner (and made to keep one hand in or on their face while seated). Life just isn't fair.
Thanks from luke

Last edited by AntiHero; Aug 28th 2014 at 02:57 AM.
AntiHero is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 02:57 AM   #55
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

Off to my Airbnb in Tuscany for a few nights:







Yeah, I got lost. They'd given me their precise GPS coordinates, but my Garmin had stopped working and my phone cut out just before getting there. An Italian guy comes hauling ass down a gravel road in a Panda. He was either very happy to see a Ducati or very happy to have found his new guest. Or maybe both. I followed him up the dirt road and into one of those locations on the planet that seem too perfect to be believable or real. Yet, there I was.











View from the dining area:



In, say, a competing wine region in the US such as Napa, this would be a $500 a night place. In the heart of Tuscany--35 Euros. No, wait--30 Euros? Let's see--how should I express my opinion eloquently. Ah, here we go: FUCK YOU CALIFORNIA!!!!
Thanks from jcbertin, Phl, luke and 3 others
AntiHero is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 02:58 AM   #56
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

My little cottage villa there on the left.



View from my front door:



View from the kitchen:



The main house where the wonderful proprietors live:





Old olive press (it is an olive farm, btw):



Some of the most delicious salad (and the only bread salad) I've ever eaten with the most incredible olives in it.



I could have eaten a gallon of it. So good!
Thanks from Phl and HotIce
AntiHero is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 03:05 AM   #57
Senior Member
 
AntiHero's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Round the World on an 1199

Posts: 2,084
Thanks: 2252

As your reactions suggest, the countryside is where the glory of Italy resides. Florence and all of the strained efforts by man to construct monuments to their gods just seemed so comparatively artificial and uninspiring.



That shit just looks like a giant paper cutout.



The repertoire of gleeful expressions are infectious!



"Hee heee heee!"


Every now and then I found a remote an unused alley to provide a much-needed respite from the maddness.





If that fails, head for bridges and water:







And of course, there are squares and areas not marked on the tourist maps that allow some private reflection.





Somewhere along the way I took a picture of the hundreds-strong line to get into the museum housing Michelangelo's David. I figured I'd come back the following morning to avoid the monotony of wasting two valuable hours pressed ass to crotch in the sun. But after seeing so many fantastic replicas, decided I needn't bother.



And then, purely by accident, discovered a David I that I could take a picture of with my bike. I never had to deal with the problem of male nudity in any of my photos. Butt--or penis--were the only two choices I had. Sorry to disappoint all you penis men out there, but I chose butt. Plus it makes a nice parting shot for Florence. Bye!

Thanks from Phl and HotIce
AntiHero is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 06:23 AM   #58
Senior Member
 
Joined: Apr 2014
From: USA/CA

Posts: 151
Thanks: 39

Finding food hard in Italy?
You sure do not find many (or any) 24h open restaurants, but that's a plus for me
Even little bars always get fresh pastries in the morning, and also get small panini we get for breakfast.
There is at least on bar in every city with more than 10 people living in it.
Also, look out for small grocery shops, as they always have a section where they sell salumi, which can prepare you a tasty panino
Agriturismo, means, food. Might have specific breakfast, lunch, dinner hours, but if you show up hungry, they will feed you.
Oh, yes, and the place where you went is a Circolo Arci, which are places where people (mostly aged) gather for talks, playing bocce, drinking, etc...
HotIce is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 01:04 PM   #59
Senior Member
 
The Duchess of Desmo's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2013
From: West Midlands, UK

Posts: 678
Thanks: 237

I Ride: Panigale 1299 (base) Panigale 1199 sold, MultiPP&scrambler-sold,DVT multi 1200,use of MT09sp,gxsr750
I know just what you mean, arriving in Florence was so busy we just wanted to turn and go back to the fields and countryside in Tuscany!
The Duchess of Desmo is offline  
Old Aug 28th 2014, 05:50 PM   #60
Senior Member
 
Joined: May 2013
From: West Coast

Posts: 562
Thanks: 90

I Ride: 15 Pani R ( I weep a little sometimes )
Ahh, what a nice read these past 6 pages. Thanks so much, Dennis, and be Safe!
Fragile is offline  
Reply

  Ducati Forum > Ducati Panigale Forum > Ride Reports

Tags
italian, round, supermodel, world



Search tags for this page
Click on a term to search for related topics.
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Discussions
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Another Italian Soon to Occupy the Garage! SOULRIDER Racing 16 Jun 23rd 2014 03:41 PM
cow tag fit for a supermodel Fragile Ducati 1199 4 Oct 2nd 2013 08:15 PM
Your Italian Information Connection... Derek Ducati 1199 6 Aug 28th 2013 07:03 AM
$27K - Italian Super Model or a Scotch Trauma Motorcycle Talk 4 Jan 21st 2013 06:10 PM
supermodel knocked on my door the flashman Ducati 1199 30 Dec 2nd 2012 11:14 AM


Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Feed