IMU questions

Mar 2019
47
11
Hanford CA
So after doing a little research, it looks like Ducati has updated or changed the IMUs in the Panigale. The 2015 R model listed part number is 38540071A for the IMU. In 2016 is was the same number. In 2017 it changed to 38540072A. It is currently listed as 38540073B.

Apparently the V4 has 2 different IMUs. One of them is the same part number of 38540073B the other being 38540081B.

Does anyone know the difference between the various models? Am I correct in assuming that the most recent one, 38540073B would work on all of the 1199 Panigales thru 1299 Panigales including one of the V4s?
 
Mar 2019
47
11
Hanford CA
Well Ducati changed the IMU yet again in 2019 for the V4. There is just a single IMU part number 38540092A. So what does all this mean? I dont know. Are the latest generations compatible with older Panigales? I guess I will have to just find out.
On a separate but related note, anyone know what the fuck the IMU does? It is listed in the parts catalog as the "Piattaforma Inerziale" Google translated to "Inertial Platform" and I have no fucking clue what that means.
 

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Oct 2017
173
81
New York
Ok, let me help in the small way I can.
The IMU controls all of your electronics. Wheelie control, slide control, power inputs, etc...
That said, the IMU “MUST” have a perfect angle in order for it to work properly. I learned this when I exchanged my stock 2017 Panigale fairings for race fairings. The LED headlight of the 1299”S” comes out, but you MUST have the correct angle when reinstalling the IMU. You can’t simply ZIP tie it like I did...lol
Now, electronics were changed in 2017, so I have no doubt that there is a different IMU.
I really hope this helped. Sorry if it didn’t.
 
Jul 2015
127
34
Oslo, Norway
Alright. I work with robitics and a lot with IMU stuff.
IMU stands for "Inertial Measurement Unit" and is a small electronic component that records the foces being acted upon it. It usually consists of acellerometers, gyroscopes and sometimes magnometer (a magnometer measures it's relation to true north).
So the recording of the lean angle comes from the IMU, here the IMU is the sensor. That is why they stress that the installation should be done right (or else you prob could display something like 88deg lean haha). Since the lean angle data in newer panigales is used as input to determine toruqe out on the back wheel (ecpecially if you have the DTC EVO upgrade i.e), then what the lean angle is, is important.

The IMU would also have the possibility to record heavy breaking, or acceleration, and it can be that the electronics uses this data in some way, I don't know.
As a standalone part of a electonic chip, IMU's are really cheap. You can buy them inmany maker electronics stores, for example here.
IMU's operate on different Degrees of Freedom (DoF). A 3DoF IMU can record forces in three axis. Regular in newer robotics applications is 9 axis. I assume that the newer IMU's on the panigales maybe have more DoF's that the earlier once.
So then does it (different DoF's) matter? No, if the ECU does not use the additional information from the additional axis, recording of forces in more axises is completely irrelevant.
But Never IMU's are probably more precise. Assuming that the measurements are more precise, will such a IMU be a reasonable upgrade? No imo wasted money. We are talking about a motorcycle here, there are a lot of other factors affecting the accuracy of the measurement (in a bad way). I don't think there would be any difference for the rider with regards to more accurate measurements.
It could be that newer IMU's are more reliable and less faulty (the most probable assumption). In that regard, I haven't heard of any problems with the IMU other than installment issues (which has nothing to do with the reliability of the IMU).

So in conclusion, if you have the DTC EVO electronics upgrade and you really really use that to it's max, then prob go with a 2017 or newer IMU if you really want to change it. But I wouldn't, imo it is really a waste of money.
 
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Mar 2019
47
11
Hanford CA
Thanks for the response. That makes sense now. I guess that explains why the small part is over $800 USD. So I can see a new IMU in my future then since it appears to be causing the issue with my 2016 Panigale R. :(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(
 
Jul 2015
127
34
Oslo, Norway
Thanks for the response. That makes sense now. I guess that explains why the small part is over $800 USD. So I can see a new IMU in my future then since it appears to be causing the issue with my 2016 Panigale R. :(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(
No problem (would apprechiate a like though ;)
What is the issue?
 
Mar 2019
47
11
Hanford CA
So I brought it down to a Ducati dealer and plugged it into the "Ducati tool". It indicated that there were 15 different IMU codes dating back to July. So thats most likely the issue. Apparently my existing IMU does not like to ride in a straight line for 33 miles.
 
Apr 2017
442
114
Detroit
So I brought it down to a Ducati dealer and plugged it into the "Ducati tool". It indicated that there were 15 different IMU codes dating back to July. So thats most likely the issue. Apparently my existing IMU does not like to ride in a straight line for 33 miles.
Did you ask why their Ducati tool found 15 IMU codes?
 
Jul 2015
127
34
Oslo, Norway
So I brought it down to a Ducati dealer and plugged it into the "Ducati tool". It indicated that there were 15 different IMU codes dating back to July. So thats most likely the issue. Apparently my existing IMU does not like to ride in a straight line for 33 miles.
Yeah you most likely are experiencing a realiability issue. Some electronics components just become faulty, it happens